Millennials trust democracy less than their parents

Attitudes towards the value of elections and virtue of authoritarianism finds younger people in developed countries have less faith in democracy than their parents and grandparents, a study has found.

Source: www.trtworld.com

Young people are losing confidence in democracy and have become more receptive to authoritarianism, the New York Times reported on Tuesday, citing a new study.

The report, “The Democratic Disconnect,” looked at the views of older people and younger people in several countries, asking whether they thought democracy was important and if authoritarian rule would be acceptable if elected politicians failed to maintain order.

The researchers discovered that younger people had far less faith in democracy, a trend reflected in the ascent of populist movements in the United States and Europe, which have seen a surge anti-immigrant sentiment in political rhetoric and policy.

Millennials in the United States and Europe appear to be more receptive than their parents to scrapping elections altogether. The survey found that, “14 percent of baby-boomers say that it is ‘unimportant’ in a democracy for people to ‘choose their leaders in free elections…Among millennials, this figure rises to 26 percent.'”

The report appears in the January edition of the Journal of Democracy, and looked at countries where political scientists had assumed democracy and civil rights had won a permanent place in public life.

Harvard professor Yascha Mounk, who co-authored the study, said…[read the full article at www.trtworld.com]