How Millennials Are Changing Beauty

“We’re entering a time when women are open to authenticity—who they are, and want to be, in real life—like never before. Now more than ever, people are striving to develop their own unique identities, go on their own journey, and talk about it.”

Source: www.nylon.com

Shopping at Glossier’s flagship store feels a bit like entering a cult. Opening the door to a tiny, empty room on Lafayette Street in lower Manhattan which houses the makeup and skin-care brand’s products, I’m greeted by a redhead in a pastel pink lab coat, matching pink pants, and blindingly white sneakers.“Are you here for the showroom?” she asks, perched on a white bar stool.I feebly nod, she makes a scribble in her pink notebook, and I’m directed to take the elevator to the penthouse. Yes, shopping at Glossier is akin to joining a secret society of sorts—but that’s no accident. Since its launch by Into The Gloss founder Emily Weiss in 2014, Glossier has built an obsessive following on its promise of low-maintenance, “no-makeup” makeup for “real girls in real life.” The company oozes girl power through pastel pink branding, products that highlight natural beauty, and cheeky self-love slogans like “skin is in” or “you’re not just a skin type.” In an age of enormous millennial feminist activism, this is exactly the message our generation is asking to receive from people in the beauty industry, and they’re not letting us down. Emerging brands like Glossier, Milk Makeup, and others are reflecting and responding to a changing clientele, one comprising women who no longer have the time for complicated beauty routines, nor subscribe to the outdated mindset that we need them…[read the full artice at www.nylon.com]